Plato’s Theory of Forms Review

Introduction In his theory, Plato argues that ideas or Forms have a very highly founded degree of reality which is different from the material world we know of, that is susceptible to change. The kind of Form Plato talks about is capitalized and is distinct from the one that is...

Theory of John Locke

Introduction The philosopher John Locke believed that there are no innate ideas and during birth, our mind is like a “blank slate”, a condition he referred to as “tabula rasa”. This blank slate is filled by experiences obtained through senses and manifestations of the things we observe. He argued that...

Philosophy and Its Goals

Philosophy means consideration of general fundamental questions to be the kind of things existing. It also looks at the limits of knowledge, the nature, scope, moral judgment and the nature of language and the mind. What makes philosophy different from other forms of addressing such kind of questions is because...

The Good Life Definition in Philosophy Works

Introduction The prudent man, according to Aristotle, is “able to deliberate well about what is good and advantageous for himself as a means, to the Good life in general. That pragmatic ability, in turn, depends upon his self-knowledge and his knowledge of ultimate causes. Thus, as we have seen, the...

History of Philosophy in the USA

Introduction The online Compact Oxford English Dictionary (2008) defines philosophy as “The study of the fundamental nature of knowledge, reality, and existence”. Every nation has its own national philosophy, which is derived in parts, from the works of great philosophers. The US constitution and the body of law too were...

The Problems of Metaphysics

Introduction The word Metaphysics is derived from the Greek letter Ta Phusika which according to the online Compact Oxford English Dictionary (2008) means “the things after the Physics, referring to the sequence of Aristotle’s works”. It also refers to philosophy concerned with abstract concepts such as the nature of existence...

Rene Descartes’ Concept of Knowledge

“Knowledge is conviction based on a reason so strong that it can never be shaken by any stronger reason” (Descartes, 2004, 1640 letter, vol. 3, pp. 64 – 65). Discussing the conception of knowledge, established by Rene Descartes, in the terms of metaphysics and epistemology, it can be stated that...

Aristotle, a Founding Father of Greek Philosophy

Introduction Aristotle is considered one of the founding fathers of Greek and western philosophy. A student of Plato, he pondered and wrote about a wide range of topics from poetry to metaphysics and the first to create a comprehensive system of morality, politics, science and logic as well as metaphysics....

Meditations on First Philosophy by René Descarte

Descartes’ work have always emphasized on the concept of rigorous philosophical inquiry with an inside-to-out strategy. The investigation of ideas is the one that is related with the strategy already mentioned while grounding the judgments for thorough inspection of the ideas that mind develops. Meditation is proposal that Descartes made...

“Mediations” by Rene Descartes and “Tao Te Ching” by Lao Tzu’s

Introduction Studying the problem and the interpretation of knowledge as a major and in the philosophy of all times, raises an arguable and complex question of one’s ability to know something for sure and, if such knowledge can be regarded as a definite truth, while evaluating objectively and sufficiently Discussion...

The Theory of Moral Development by Lawrence Kohlberg

Working as a developmental psychologist then turning his interest to the field of moral education, Lawrence Kohlberg became to be well known for his theory of moral development. His theory spurred the interest of the psychological community on moral development (Nucci, 2002). His ideas were influenced by Jean Piaget, John...

Citizenship and the Law in Plato’s “Crito”

Introduction In Plato’s Crito, Socrates is presented as sitting in his jail cell awaiting his execution. His old friend Crito arrives to help him escape, but Socrates argues that he cannot escape because citizens must always obey the law. According to Socrates, the Law exists as a single body rather...

Falsifiability Concept in Science

Introduction Falsifiability, or refutability, as it is also called sometimes, is the possibility that a theory or any other assertion can be proved to be false. However, this does not mean that the theory or assertion is necessarily false; instead, this means that its falseness can be displayed by physical...

All Animals Are Equal

Introduction Equality refers to a situation where all organisms are accorded similar treatment where their right to exist is respected. Therefore, human beings deserve to be treated well where their right to live fully should be the moral responsibility of each and every individual. However, the treatment that is given...

Philosophical War Between Aristotle and Plato

Introduction Much of philosophy is seen as a tug of war between Aristotle and Plato since their main point of conflict is their differing view on human functions and their role in ethics. They differ on what human function is. Plato believes that human function is the deliberate, ruling, living,...

Religion Philosophy “Gagging of God” by D. A. Carson

Introduction In Gagging of God, D.A. Carson presents his argument in favor of Jesus Christ being the only valid pathway to reaching God and salvation. Beginning with an investigation into the concept of pluralism, a natural outgrowth of the postmodern world in which we live, Carson examines these concepts for...

Plato and Aristotle on Women in Politics

Ancient philosophy was rich in an outstanding thinker who outlined the eternal truths and observation about the world, the nature of human beings and their behavior, the origin of art and the essence of beauty, vice and virtue as well as many other concepts that are hard to find a...